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“Simplify Your Database Queries with the Logic App Standard and Built-in SQL Connector!”

Trigger SQL Views with Logic App Standard with the Built-in SQL Connector
Introduction
The cloud has revolutionized the way businesses operate. Cloud solutions provide a variety of features and benefits, including scalability, cost savings, and improved security. However, integrating cloud solutions into existing business processes can be challenging. This is where Logic Apps can help. Logic Apps is an Azure-based integration service that enables developers to quickly and easily develop connections between cloud and on-premise applications. In this article, we will discuss how to use the built-in SQL Connector to trigger SQL views with Logic App Standard.

What Is Logic Apps?
Logic Apps is an Azure-based integration service that enables developers to quickly and easily develop connections between cloud and on-premise applications. It provides a visual designer, which allows developers to quickly create workflows and integrate with enterprise systems and services. Logic Apps also supports a variety of triggers, such as webhooks, timers, and queues.

What Is the Built-in SQL Connector?
The built-in SQL Connector is a Logic App trigger that enables developers to quickly and easily create workflows that are triggered when a SQL view is updated. This trigger can be used to monitor changes in a SQL view and react to those changes. For example, a SQL view can be used to trigger an alert when a particular column value changes.

How to Use the Built-in SQL Connector
Using the built-in SQL Connector is straightforward and requires only a few simple steps.

Step 1: Create a Logic App
The first step is to create a Logic App. To do this, log into the Azure Portal and click on the “Create a resource” button. Select “Logic App” from the list of options and click “Create”.

Step 2: Design the Workflow
Next, design the workflow in the Logic App designer. This is done by dragging and dropping connectors and triggers into the workflow. For this example, the SQL Connector will be used to monitor the SQL view and trigger the workflow when the view is updated.

Step 3: Configure the Trigger
Once the SQL Connector is added to the workflow, it needs to be configured. This is done by selecting the SQL view to monitor, the columns to monitor, and the conditions for triggering the workflow.

Step 4: Create the Actions
Once the trigger is configured, the next step is to create the actions. These are the steps that will be taken when the workflow is triggered. This can include sending an email, creating a task in a project management system, or any other action that needs to be taken.

Step 5: Test and Deploy the Workflow
The last step is to test and deploy the workflow. This can be done by running a test and verifying that the workflow is triggered correctly. Once the workflow is tested and verified, it can be deployed to production.

Conclusion
The built-in SQL Connector is a powerful and useful tool for triggering Logic Apps workflows. By using the SQL Connector, developers can quickly and easily create workflows that are triggered when a SQL view is updated. This allows them to monitor changes in a SQL view and take action when necessary.

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