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The Countdown to Exchange Online Basic Authentication Deprecation

Basic Authentication Deprecation in Exchange Online – September 2022 Update
What is Basic Authentication?
Basic Authentication (BA) is a username/password-based method of authenticating with an Exchange server. It is the most commonly used authentication method for Outlook clients, webmail, and mobile devices. It has been used for decades, and is now being phased out in favor of OAuth 2.0 authentication.

Why is Basic Authentication being Deprecated?
Basic Authentication is an outdated authentication method that is less secure than modern alternatives, such as OAuth 2.0. It is being phased out in order to ensure the highest possible level of security for Exchange Online users.

When will Basic Authentication be Deprecated?
Microsoft has announced that Basic Authentication will be deprecated in Exchange Online in September 2022. After this date, clients that still use Basic Authentication to connect to Exchange Online will no longer be able to connect.

What are the Alternatives?
The primary alternative to Basic Authentication is OAuth 2.0. OAuth 2.0 is a modern authentication protocol that is much more secure than Basic Authentication. It is based on the OAuth 2.0 authorization framework, and is supported by the latest versions of Outlook, webmail, and mobile devices.

How to Prepare for the Deprecation of Basic Authentication?
In order to ensure a smooth transition to OAuth 2.0, administrators should start preparing now.

Step 1: Identify Clients and Devices Using Basic Authentication
The first step is to identify which clients and devices are still using Basic Authentication to connect to Exchange Online. This can be done by running a series of PowerShell commands, or by using a third-party auditing tool.

Step 2: Migrate to OAuth 2.0
Once the clients and devices have been identified, the next step is to migrate them to OAuth 2.0. This can be done by using the built-in migration tools in Exchange Online, or by using a third-party migration tool.

Step 3: Monitor and Test
Once the migration is complete, administrators should monitor the clients and devices to ensure that they are connecting using OAuth 2.0. They should also test the clients and devices to ensure that they are working as expected.

Conclusion
Basic Authentication is an outdated authentication method that is being phased out in favor of OAuth 2.0. In order to ensure a smooth transition, administrators should start preparing now. They should identify which clients and devices are still using Basic Authentication, and then migrate them to OAuth 2.0. Once the migration is complete, they should monitor and test the clients and devices to ensure that they are working as expected.
References:
Basic Authentication Deprecation in Exchange Online – September 2022 Update

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